Open source reader

Wednesday, April 19, 2006

Java web framework sweet spots, Ruby on rails bashed

Read in http://www.virtuas.com/files/JavaWebFrameworkSweetSpots.pdf
excerpt:

This document was compiled by asking a number of different Java web framework authors the following questions:

1. What is your framework’s “sweet spot”, and for what type of projects should it strongly be considered?
2. What type of scenarios does it not fit into? Would you recommend another framework in this scenario? If so, which one?
3. Of the other web frameworks mentioned below, have you tried any of them? If so, which ones, and what did you like about them? What didn’t you like?
4. What is the future of your web framework? What’s coming that’ll make it easier for users to develop with? Do you support Ajax natively? If not, are you planning on adding support?
5. Are there myths about your framework you’d like to challenge? If so, which ones?
6. What do you think of Ruby on Rails?


Something I found very interresting about ruby on rails (http://www.rubyonrails.org/) by patrick lightbody (main developer of http://www.opensymphony.com/webwork/)


I’ve used Rails to build a small app. I threw it away and rewrote it in Java in less time. I would say that Rails does let you get 80% of your app done rather quickly; the last 20% still takes much longer than the first 80% took. This is classic application development.
The scaffolding stuff is very cool, especially how the ActiveRecord changes the classes at runtime. But in the end, you end up having to write custom UIs, custom validation rules, custom security mappings, etc. Just because you can have a CRUD-based app “working” in 30 minutes doesn’t mean that you will continue at that pace.


Ok let's re-read this last sentense:


Just because you can have a CRUD-based app “working” in 30 minutes doesn’t mean that you will continue at that pace.

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